August 2018

Why you should stop delighting your customers (and what to do instead)

Why you should stop delighting your customers (and what to do instead)

You hear a lot in business literature about the crazy customer stories. The Zappos call that went for 12 hours, the Southwest Airlines pilot who didn’t leave until a late passenger was on board, and when Trader Joe’s delivered food to a snowed-in man. They’re amazing stories, they warm your heart, and (to be honest) they make great PR for these companies.

The problem with these stories is that they are a 1 in a 1000 situation. They don’t represent most interactions with customers. This idea of focusing on delight is actually kind of bonkers. Going above and beyond 1 in every 1000 customers is not as good as hitting the mark perfectly on 999 of those same customers, even if it’s not service worthy of a viral article.

How to make a good first impression with potential customers

How to make a good first impression with potential customers

When we’re talking about acquiring new customers you probably think about creating funnels, considering paying to promote your social media profile or advertising locally. All of these things are important, of course, and should form part of your marketing plan.

It’s only the first part of the journey though, once you get a customer to sign up for your email list, like your Facebook page or even just go to your website, how do you make a good first impression? How do you build trust and encourage them to become customers without engaging in gross sales-y behaviour?

Three ways to build customer loyalty

Three ways to build customer loyalty

Building a base of loyal customers is one of the most important tasks a small business should have on their to do list. A small business can’t compete with a large one on price or logistics, but it can knock any large company out of the water by focusing on building customer loyalty